Home Archive Vol.42, No.3, 2016 Role of Metabolites of Nitric Oxide and Arginase in the Pathogenesis of Glomerulonephritis

Role of Metabolites of Nitric Oxide and Arginase in the Pathogenesis of Glomerulonephritis

ANGELA CIUNTU(1)

(1)Pediatric Department, State University of Medicine and Pharmacy „Nicolae Testemitanu”, Chișinău Paediatrics National Institute of Health Care for Mother and Child, Nephrology Unit, R.Moldova

    Abstract: Purpose: The aim of the study is to assess the level of nitric oxide metabolites and arginase in the urine of children with glomerulonephritis depending on clinical evolutional stages of the disease. Materials and methods: The prospective study included 65 children with primary glomerulonephritis, 25 children with steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) and 20 children with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), 20 children with mixed form of chronic glomerulonephritis(CGN). Results: Thus in the SRNS group, during relapse period the concentration of NO metabolites in urine was increased by 4,2 times, while in SSNS by 3,0 times in comparison with the control group. The concentration of NO metabolites in the urine increased by 4,8 times during relapse CGN mixed form in comparison to the control values. During remission, the levels of NO metabolites in the urine remain increased in both groups. In relapse of SSNS arginase levels in the urine increased by 4,5 times in comparation to SRNS, thus the concentration of arginase was reduced. During remission period arginase levels in the urine were practically reduced to the levels of the control group. In the mixed form of CGN, relapse period arginase levels in the urine were increased by 2,9 times and during remission were decreased by almost 1,9 times in comparision to the control group. Conclusions: Assesment of NO metabolites and arginase in urine can be used as a diagnostic method in order to monitor renal disease process, evolution and effectiveness of the applied treatment.
    Keywords: metabolites of nitric oxide, arginase, glomerulonephritis, children

DOI 10.12865/CHSJ.42.03.01 


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Volume 42 Issue 3 2016