Curr Health Sci J, vol. 47, no. 3, 2021

A Cross-Sectional Study to Assess Thyroid Function in Infants and Children in a City from South-Western Romania

[Original Paper]

C.M. Vasile(1,2), A.E. Ghenea(3), A.L. Udristoiu(4), S. Udristoiu(4), M. Popescu(5), V. Padureanu(6), D.O. Alexandru(7)


(1)PhD School, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Romania,
(2)Department of Pediatric Cardiology, County Clinical Emergency Hospital of Craiova, Romania,
(3)Department of Bacteriology-Virology-Parasitology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Romania,
(4)Faculty of Automation, Computers and Electronics, University of Craiova, Romania,
(5)Department of Endocrinology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Romania,
(6)Department of Internal Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Romania,
(7)Department of Medical Informatics and Biostatistics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Romania


Abstract:

Thyroid hormones are critical regulators of growth, myelination of the nervous system, metabolism, and organ function. The most prevalent endocrinopathies in childhood are related to thyroid disorders. Thyroid problems in children and adolescents have a significantly different etiology and clinical presentation than in adults. Thus, pediatric medical care involves an understanding of the unique features of thyroid function and dysfunction during childhood and adolescence. The etiology and clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders in children and adolescents are vastly different from those in adults. The particular aspects of thyroid function and malfunction in childhood and adolescence are hence part of pediatric medical therapy. To prevent persistent nervous system damage and developmental problems, it is vital to recognize and treat thyroid dysfunction in neonates as early as possible. The purpose of the research was to understand more how children's thyroid problems function, structure, and prevalence. The research examined 30 children under the age of 16 years who had symptoms that were linked to thyroid problems. In addition to demographic and family information, thyroid ultrasounds and blood samples for the detection of T3, T4, and TSH were obtained. Females surpassed males by a small majority (2.33:1 ratio).Out of the total children included in the study, 14(46.7%) cases for autoimmune thyroiditis, 2(6.67%) cases for congenital hypothyroidism, 1(3.33%) case for hyperthyroidism, 1(3.33%) case for hyperthyroidism-Graves disease, 8(26.7%) cases for hypothyroidism and 4(13.3%) cases for subclinical hypothyroidism.


Keywords:
Thyroid disorders, children, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism.



Corresponding:
Alice Elena Ghenea, Department of Bacteriology-Virology-Parasitology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, 200349 Craiova, Romania, e-mail: gaman_alice@yahoo.com; Vlad Padureanu, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Romania, e-mail: vldpadureanu@yahoo.com


DOI 10.12865/CHSJ.47.03.13 - Download PDF